We’ve got fall covered

We’re talking pillow covers today.

As far as I’m concerned, they’re one of the best ways to change the feel of a room. Especially when it’s officially mid-October and that’s the only fall decorating you’ve gotten around to!

They’re relatively small to store but can make a big impact in a room. They can range from elegant to whimsical. And they’re fairly inexpensive, especially if you know how to sew them.

fall envelope pillows with a button closure
fall envelope pillows with a button closure

If you’ve never made a pillow cover then stick around for a few minutes to see how simple it can be.

My fall pillow collection includes some slightly flecked brown fur pillows from my Mama’s fabric stash and some envelope pillows made out of upholstery fabric and salvaged linen. They are similar to the winter snow pillows you can find here with the added detail of a button.

The pieces you will need for an 18″ pillow are as follows:
19″ square of pillow front fabric (medallion in this case)
19″ x 10″ piece of pillow back fabric for bottom (linen in this case)
19″ x 14″ piece of pillow back fabric for top (linen)

Step 1: Hem one long edge of the bottom back piece (linen) with a 1/2″ double hem. To make a double hem you fold and press the raw edge under 1/2″ and do it again so the raw edge is enclosed in the hem. Stitch this 1/8″ to 1/4″ from the loose edge of the first fold being sure to catch all three layers of fabric so it doesn’t unravel.

1/2" rolled hem stitched close to loose edge
1/2″ rolled hem stitched close to loose edge

Step 2: Hem one edge of the top back piece (linen) in a similar fashion. Fold and press under 1/2″ along one long raw edge. The second fold needs to be 2″ deep to give it a sturdier look. Hem close to the first 1/2″ fold through all three layers of fabric.

top back ready to stitch to pillow front
top back ready to stitch to pillow front

Step 3: Pin the top back to the front of the pillow, right sides together and matching raw edges. This will leave the finished edge somewhere in the middle of the pillow. Next, pin the bottom back to the other edge of the front piece, right sides together and matching raw edges. The top and bottom back pieces will be overlapping about 2″. Stitch around all four edges. Trim the seams and use a zig zag stitch to keep them from raveling.

stitching pillow front to back
stitching pillow front to back

You just finished a basic envelope pillow! Go grab yourself a cup of coffee or chocolate or snap a IG pic with some clever #s, then come right back so we can add a little embellishment.

Step 4: Adding a button to the back of the pillow. I wanted a large button, but the selection at the fabric store was a bit lame, so I wandered over to the drapery section and found a tie back with about 16 large bamboo buttons. Score! With my coupon it wasn’t much more than the single less impressive buttons. Thinking a little outside the box can really make all the difference sometimes.

button loop stitched close to both long edges
button loop stitched close to both long edges

The button I used is 2″ in diameter, so I cut a piece of linen 8″ x 2″ for the button loop. You may need to adjust these measurements depending on the size of your button. Fold and press the loop fabric wrong sides together the long way. Fold and press each of the long raw edges into the center and stitch close to both long edges. Your strip should measure 8″ x 1/2″.

Step 5: Stitch the loop to the inside seam of the top flap at the center as shown in the picture below

button loop stitched to back bottom seam
button loop stitched to back bottom seam

Lay your button on the pillow so it lines up with the button loop and lightly mark it with a pen or pencil. Use a piece of mid-weight interfacing when stitching on the button to keep your fabric from ripping where the button is attached.

button placement
button placement
interfacing to reinforce fabric behind button
interfacing to reinforce fabric behind button

And that’s it! Insert your pillow form and you’re set. My favorite pillow forms are down ones that I’ve picked up at thrift stores and thrown directly into my washer on hot water and then tossed in the dryer. They’re cozy and keep their shape for years compared to the typical lumpy batting variety.

You can whip up a few this weekend and finish decorating for the fall season. Or actually begin decorating as the case may be!

As usual, if you decide to make a pillow or two, include a picture in the comments. We can all use a little inspiration from time to time.

About Beth Moore

A Christ-follower, wife, mom to 4, lifestyle blogger, seamstress and seeker of daily glimpses of God's grace and redemption.

5 thoughts on “We’ve got fall covered

  1. That’s fantastic, Beth! I have a couple of the envelope pillow covers in different colors. I use them as you do, with the change of seasons. I’ve thought of making some and with your great tutorial that becomes doable!

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